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The Truth About Alice, Book Review 

Author: Jennifer Mathieu

Published: June 2014, Roaring Brook Press

In the tradition of Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher – this book gives a scarily true representation of a teenage world and the seemingly terrible horrors that can transpire within it.

Everyone knows Alice slept with two guys at one party.

But did you know Alice was sexting Brandon when he crashed his car?

It’s true. Ask ANYBODY.

Rumor has it that Alice Franklin is a slut. It’s written all over the bathroom stall at Healy High for everyone to see. And after star quarterback Brandon Fitzsimmons dies in a car accident, the rumors start to spiral out of control.

In this remarkable debut novel, four Healy High students—the girl who has the infamous party, the car accident survivor, the former best friend, and the boy next door—tell all they know.

But exactly what is the truth about Alice? In the end there’s only one person to ask: Alice herself.

We’ve all been there – high school. It’s not the greatest place in the world for all of us. For some, it can be an easy ride, but for others it can turn into hell in a heartbeat. Alice is one of those others. She seemingly had it all – looks, popularity, friends, grades. But after one fateful summer party, the rumours start. And Alice is at the centre of them all.

TruthAboutAliceThis book is so simple at a first glance – and I don’t mean that in a bad way. It’s easy to read and it flows and it’s not at all hard to get into. From the very beginning you just want to know what happened to Alice: did she really do it, why are people saying all these things? And from four different points of view, everything slowly starts to unravel, the story takes shape and becomes so much more complex that you ever would have thought.

The characters are all very relatable. Even though I was never a popular American teenage girl, I can still see where Elaine is coming from, her reputation on the line if she doesn’t ditch Alice immediately, and her anger at the rumours themselves. Josh is also part of that popular world, best friends with the star quarter back, he seemed to have it all planned out, until Alice came along and ruined it. Kurt sits comfortably on the other side of the fence, no friends, but content in not having to translate life for the stupid masses, and this gives him a different view of Alice, too. And then there’s poor Kelsey, the former best friend of the now infamous Alice Franklin, who slowly divulges why she left Alice for dead (socially). Between the four of them, we find out what Alice did. Or do we?

This is an emotionally charged journey, in which Alice finds herself in the midst of a tremendous and ugly rumour mill. Teenagers can be really cruel, but sometimes, they’re only doing it to protect themselves, and sometimes, they’re even extremely kind. Finding out why is half the fun of this story. This book has a really interesting view point, and explores what happens when a rumour starts and can’t be stopped. Recommended to fans of contemporary YA fiction.

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Read Me Like a Book, Book Review

Author: Liz Kessler   

Published: May 2015 by Indigo

This book spoke to me.

There are several reasons that I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book. One of them is definitely the writing – so easy and flowing, the type of writing that prevents you putting the book down willingly. Another is the story, it’s so simple and so relatable that it just sucked me right in and didn’t want to let me go. Last was Ash – I saw so much of my younger self in her that there was no way I wasn’t gonna fall in love with her.

The premise is simple:

Ashleigh Walker is in love. You know the feeling – that intense, heart-racing, all-consuming emotion that can only come with first love. It’s enough to stop her worrying about bad grades at college. Enough to distract her from her parents’ marriage troubles. There’s just one thing bothering her . . .

Shouldn’t it be her boyfriend, Dylan, who makes her feel this way – not Miss Murray, her English teacher?

readmelikeabookI think there need to be more books like this one going around, no fairy-tale crap, no misleading happy endings. Just real feelings, real characters, a disarming sense of loss but no life stunting sadness (think Twilight and Bella’s ridiculous breakdown) – this story feels real. It’s real life and it’s really relatable; chances are that we’ve all had an unrequited crush on someone – and its crappy, but it’s not the end of the world. And this book tackles that beautifully.

I loved Ash. She reminded me so much of a teenage version of myself, back when emotions – particularly those that you haven’t experienced before – can be insanely confusing. Ash deals with things in a normal, teenage way: she withdraws, she lashes out, she bottles things in, she fights with her friends, she makes silly mistakes and wrong moves; Ash is just so very relatable and I love her persona so much. In fact, I’m sure I’d put my love for this book down to Ash and her character, and how well she is written.

Unrequited love is harsh. It’s cold and lonely and confusing, particularly when the receiving end is a teacher. Even more so if they are the same-sex as you. Discovering yourself as a teenager is hard, its complicated and it takes a certain amount of bravery. Liz Kessler writes this so poetically that it is integrated almost seamlessly into her amazing story. This is the type of book I would have read a hundred times during high-school had it been available to me back then, purely on the basis that someone, somewhere, knew how it felt to feel like you weren’t normal, but so totally normal at the same time; like everyone knew who you were but you and they were all waiting for you to catch up.

The actual story itself isn’t very difficult to follow – it’s a simple love story: girl meets boy, girl likes boy, boy likes girl, girl realises she doesn’t really like boy, girl likes teacher, teacher doesn’t like girl like that, girl feels rejected and confused… (okay, maybe not so simple.) But simple as it may be, the story is utterly engaging, it’s completely enthralling and it just left me wanting more. Honestly, it was a lovely, honest and sweet coming out story, there’s nothing over-the-top or smothering about this book, and I would recommend it to anyone; gay, straight or left-handed.

The story also deals with the separation of Ash’s parents and the breakdown of their marriage. This is not something I have experienced myself, but was still detailed throughout the story in a way that I could still relate to what Ash was feeling. The character growth that pulls Ash through the book is wonderfully written, and also not so much so that she comes out the other end a totally different person; I really liked that Ash still felt like the same character at the end as at the beginning, yet subtly different, enough so that we can figure she really has done a decent amount of self-discovering through-out the book.

Added bonus: I am an English fanatic, I loved it in high school, I majored in it at Uni, I am a readaholic adult and I just love writing. So the fact that this story not only focuses on Ash’s English teacher, but also her own growing adoration of studying English really engaged me. Loved it.

Brutally honest and unceasingly charming, this book should be read by teenagers (and adults) the world over.

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Popsugar 2015 Reading ChallengeA Book Set in Another Country

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Ketchup Clouds, Book Review 

Author: Annabel Pitcher 
Published: 2012 by Orion

Once again, I have finished a book and am left with a totally depressing book-hangover and a complete heart smattering over the ending. This novel is sweet, honest and touching, but written so strongly, even if it may not seem so at first, the story draws you in, hook, line, sinker and heart.

 

Fifteen-year-old Zoe has a secret—a dark and terrible secret that she can’t confess to anyone she knows. But then one day she hears of a criminal, Stuart Harris, locked up on death row in Texas. Like Zoe, Stuart is no stranger to secrets. Or lies. Or murder.

Full of heartache yet humour, Zoe tells her story in the only way she can—in letters to the man in prison in America. Armed with a pen, Zoe takes a deep breath, eats a jam sandwich, and begins her tale of love and betrayal.

kc-packshotIt took me a little bit of time to adjust to the writing, it seemed that the voice was younger than that of a fifteen-year-old, but as the story progresses, so does Zoe; and I suppose that it’s been a long time since I was fifteen, and I’m sure that my own writing voice would have been much the same at that age. However, once I got past the initial few letters, the whole tone of the book really started to reel me in, and like I’ve said before, I love epistolary novels, and this one, written in the form of letters fits the bill perfectly.

Zoe has done something: something unforgivable, something she can’t tell anyone, something she has to live with. But she has to get it out, and after a bit of good ol’ internet research, Zoe decides to write to Stuart Harris, a criminal across the world, on Death Row in Texas. She writes him letters, with no reply, and she tells him her story. She tells us her story. And it’s a tricky one. The story is complicated, emotionally charged and doesn’t stop giving the reader something to look forward to. I read almost the entire final two-thirds of the book in one sitting.

The characters are intriguing, of course, the twisted love triangle is even more so. And as Zoe gets more and more involved with each of the boys, we learn more and more about her, and more about her relationship to each of them. The most interesting thing about the novel is, technically, we know the ending. We know from the blurb alone that Zoe has done something horrible, and she is writing to a convicted murderer, and revealing her feelings of sympathy for what he must have felt or be feeling. So we can safely surmise that one of the characters is going to die and Zoe is going to have something to do with it. What I really love though, about the novel and the way the story plays out, is that as the reader, we really have no idea who is going to die until the very end of the book. And then when you get there, you’re heart just breaks. Guaranteed. ketchup-clouds-featured1

This book deals with some complicated issues, and gives a stunning insight into guilt, grief and the struggle associated with both. I loved this book, and really didn’t want it to end. But even though it did, and even if it didn’t end how I had imagined it, it was still wonderful, and fresh and very real.

Added Bonus: Here is a manuscript of a talk with Annabel Pitcher about Mental Health: Let’s talk about mental health

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Popsugar 2015 Reading ChallengeA Book written by someone under 30 (It was published in 2012, so she would have been under 30 while she was writing it :p)

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Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock – Book Review

Author: Matthew Quick 
Published: January 2014 by Headline Book Publishing

Leonard Peacock is turning 18.
And he wants to say goodbye.

Not to his former best friend, whose torments have driven him to consider committing something tragic and horrific.

Nor to his mum who’s moved out and left him to fend form himself. But to his four friends.
A Humphrey-Bogart-obsessed neighbour
A teenage violin virtuoso
A pastor’s daughter
A teacher

Most of the time, Leonard believes he’s weird and sad but these friends have made him think that maybe he’s not.

He wants to thank them, and bid them farewell.

matthewquick-forgivemeleonardpeacockI’ve read a lot of books about depression and suicide. I have had Manic Depression (Bipolar Disorder) for most of my adult life (and probably most of my young adult life, undiagnosed) and find that I can relate well to these characters, draw from their experiences and relate them back to mine, learn from them, grow with them etc, etc, etc. But this book was more than that to me. Unlike All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven, in which one of the main characters does, after much fighting against it, eventually kill himself; Leonard, is so adamant to let it consume him and end his life, and he doesn’t fight it. Leonard has accepted his fate, his doom, his demise. And he is content with it, not accepting that anyone can actually help him, regardless of whether he wants them to save him or not. Leonard’s story is about goodbye, not about battling his inner demons; Leonard’s demons have, seemingly, already won.

And that’s one of the things I really like about this book. The gritty, harsh reality of it. Because a lot of the time, (especially at that age, when the bigger picture is so very difficult to see,) giving up is the easiest option. Giving in to the desire, the burning ache, to just end everything and be done with it, is real. Leonard is a little quirky, as most male protagonists in YA lit are these days, but I like his quirks, they’re subtle and cool and even though he doesn’t seem to fit in in his shitty high school, he’d certainly feel at home in college or university. He’s smart, but he is humble. I really liked Leonard’s character.

What I loved secondly about this book, was it’s ability to keep what happened between Leonard and Asher – likely the catalyst for Leonard’s depression – under wraps until Leonard actually allowed himself to think about. Leonard had hidden it away in the deepest, darkest recesses of his mind, and did not want to think about it, and so the reader didn’t get to know about it either. The information on each character that Leonard was saying goodbye to came when, and if, it was needed.

tumblr_ms5g74snHw1rkciaro1_500I also loved, wholeheartedly, the mix of non-traditional prose in this novel. There are three main prose forms in this book: the main traditional prose through which Leonard’s story is told, footnotes to the story to add in after thoughts, additional information and anecdotes that Leonard feels the reader ought to know or to give context, and lastly the letters that Leonard writes ‘from the future’ to his teenage self. This kept the book interesting, even if the letters don’t make sense at first.

The characters, as few of them as there are, also helped to keep this book interesting. Actually, not even really the characters themselves, more the stories behind the way each character was connected to Leonard, and the thoughts that Leonard has about them, how he feels about them, and the ideas he conjures in his own imagination about each one.Herr Silverman was the one I definitely found the most interesting, the way he actually cares about Leonard, ad in a way that Leonard doesn’t even understand. In the end, even though he only kind of admits it, Leonard is glad that there was at least one person, one adult that he could turn to, talk to, and who might even be able to save him. The way Leonard sees Herr Silverman instills in the reader that eternal little blip of hope, that maybe they really aren’t completely alone. And this little blip of hope is IMPORTANT, it sends a great message to anyone that might relate closely with Leonard and his view of the world. The true, gritty insight into Leonards mind is exceedingly well written, engaging and honest, and I LOVED it. I’m sincerely looking forward to picking up more books by Matthew Quick!

Again, I have to say: It’s important to reach out for help if you think you might be suffering from depression, sometimes this is the hardest step to recovery. If you don’t feel like you can talk to anyone in your life, sometimes an anonymous ear to listen can go a long way, contacting a counselling service can save a life, or even just someone online who understands what you’re going through (yes, this is an invitation to email me if you ever need to talk to someone). Check out Beyond Blue for more information on battling depression, or suicidal thoughts.

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Popsugar 2015 Reading Challenge: A Book that Became a Movie (t’s not a movie yet, but a movie is in the works)

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Five Books I’m Really Looking Forward to Reading

I have a book addiction. Seriously, I can’t go into a bookstore without buying books, and I go into bookstores a lot. Ergo, I have a lot of books sitting on my shelves at the moment that are still waiting to be read. But they look so pretty, sitting there, waiting.

There are well over two dozen books sitting on my To Be Read (TBR) list at the moment, but here are the top five on that list that I can’t wait to read:

(Hover over the titles/authors for links to more information)

1. Forgive Me, Leonard Peacock by Matthew Quick

matthewquick-forgivemeleonardpeacockI know very little about this book, and that’s partially why I’m so excited to read it. I suppose, I tend to love any book that tackles the taboo. Such as I loved Simon Vs the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli, or even Nineteen Minutes by Jodi Picoult, this book also tackles those ever taboo issues in high school. I haven’t read any other of Matthew Quick’s books, but I saw the film of Silver Linings Playbook and that book is also on my TBR list, and hopefully this book lives up to the awesome reviews I’ve seen so far, none of which, thankfully, have given away any of the plot.

2. Ketchup Clouds by Annabel Pitcher

kc-packshotI originally picked this book up based on the gorgeous bird prints on the outer page edges, they are simply stunning. Then I read the blurb – Secrets, romance, murder and lies: Zoe shares a terrible secret in a letter to a stranger on death row. I mean, doesn’t that just seem to hook you in right away? Also – I love books that are written, or stories that are told, in non-traditional prose, so letter writing is right up my alley. A novel centred around a 15 year-old and her complicated grasp of live and emotion, this novel is certainly one that I am likely going to devour in a matter of hours.

3. Me Being Me is Exactly as Insane as You Being You by Todd Hasak-Lowy

22456952Now, to be one hundred percent honest with you, this was predminately a ‘cover buy’, although I had technically decided that I wanted to read it before I actually purchased it. I saw it on @blueyedbiblo‘s instagram feed and the cover was just gorgeous and the title equally as intriguing.  On top of that, this book is written entirely in lists. Yes, lists. Something I adore, use a lot in my day to day life and tend to be drawn to, particularly when scouring social media (think, ’20 things all girls who wear glasses know to be true’ etc.). So another non-traditional prose based novel full of teen angst I simply can’t wait to dive head first into.

4. Love Letters to the Dead by Ava Dellaira

book-coverAnother book written in letters. It seems I can’t help myself when it comes to these types of books. This book sees our protagonist writing a letter, first off, as a school project, to someone who has died, and Laurel chooses Kurt Cobain. This is admittedly one of the main reasons I want to read this book, because I am old enough to have been into Nirvana just after Kurt took his own life, so I remember actually hearing about it and coming to terms with that as a pre-teen. Death is always a hard subject to write about, and grief is even harder because we all experience it so differently. This book was going to be my first to read in May, but my copy got really badly damaged in a rainstorm not long ago, and my new copy came today, can’t wait.

5. The Shock of the Fall by Nathan Filer

The-Shock-Of-The-Fall-coverIt was the blurb of this book that made me carry it away from the shelf and up to the counter to part with my hard earned cash. The blurb consists of a simple quote in a childlike voice: “I’ll tell you what happened because it will be a good way to introduce my brother. His name’s Simon. I think you’re going to like him. I really do. But in a couple of pages he’ll be dead. And he was never the same after that.” And that was it, that’s what grabbed me. But another book about mental illness is something that I know will grab my attention, because it hits so close to home. This book has had a lot of great reviews, and seems like it’s gonna be another brilliant read.

Keep your eyes peeled for reviews of these books on my review page as I read them. You an also keep up to date on what I’m currently reading, if you feel so inclined, by following more of my book adventures on Instagram (@felixturtle_reads) and on Goodreads (felixturtle).

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Simon vs The Homo Sapiens Agenda, Book Review

Author: Becky Albertalli
Published: April 7th 2015 by Balzer + Bray

Sixteen-year-old and not-so-openly gay Simon Spier prefers to save his drama for the school musical. But when an email falls into the wrong hands, his secret is at risk of being thrust into the spotlight. Now Simon is actually being blackmailed: if he doesn’t play wingman for class clown Martin, his sexual identity will become everyone’s business. Worse, the privacy of Blue, the pen name of the boy he’s been emailing, will be compromised. 

Honestly, this is one of the cutest, most endearing books I’ve read all year. It’s honest and sweet and genuinely entertaining. At no point did I think ‘I want to put this book down’.

Albertalli has created such a genuine, believable, and relatable character in Simon Spier that all I want to do is bring him home and hang out with him, and get to know him better. And that’s what reading this book felt like, almost as though I was hanging out with Simon and getting to know him better. This book literally had me laughing, crying and squealing with delight, and I am not ashamed to admit that.

simonvsposterrodilSimon is super sweet, very cute and completely smitten with a boy he emails, but has no idea who his true identity is. In fact, Simon is trying to figure out exactly who he is himself, and how to express that true identity to those that matter to him. He has to find that right moment to perform his huge Coming Out. So far, Simon has only spoken about his being gay to one other person, and that’s Blue – his secret email pen-pal whom he doesn’t really know, but desperately wants to.

Of course, everything gets flipped on its head when things go wrong and someone screws up. And Simon is all of a sudden thrown headfirst into the whole universe knowing his secret, but he still needs to protect Blue, even though he desperately wants to know his identity himself.

The thing I think Albertalli does brilliantly, is seamlessly integrate contemporary means of communication: Facebook, email, Tumblr, text; and make it flow so naturally. The voices in the book, Simon predominately, as well as Blue, and even some of the supporting characters are so true to life, simple, messy and just fun to read. Overall, I can honestly recommend this book to anyone, of any age that loves a good book, with a fluffy ending, and none of the cheesy, fake feeling clichés. This book will now sit on my favourites shelf, proudly.

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Popsugar 2015 Reading Challenge: Another book set in high School

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Happy Star Wars Day!

Since I was a little girl, I’ve been in love with Star Wars. My dad and I would watch them together, and I used to love the loud sounds and fast flying. Heck, I was even young enough when the prequels came out to think I liked them, at least until Episode III when I realised I was wrong and the original trilogy was the only one that really mattered.

 
I loved the animated series’ that came along too; and played a lot of the games, especially Pod Racing on the N64. Star Wars was, and is, a huge part of what makes me Me. Not to mention the amazing lego sets! I love how inter-generational Star Wars is, how it has engaged kids and adults alike since the late 70s and still continues to grab new fans to this day.

And I am hella excited for the new episodes coming over the next few years starting this December. J J Abrams looks to be doing a mighty fine job, so fingers crossed we get a whole new batch of awesome flicks, and can invite yet another generation into the folds of the awesome Star Wars fan community.

So Happy Star Wars day everyone! May the Fourth be with you!

 

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All the Bright Places, Book Review

Author: Jennifer Niven
Published: January 6th 2015 by Knopf

When Finch and Violet meet on the ledge of the bell tower at school—six stories above the ground—it’s unclear who saves whom. For fans of The Fault in Our Stars and Eleanor and Park, this is an exhilarating and heart-wrenching love story about a girl who learns to live from a boy who intends to die…

 

Theodore Finch is fascinated by death, and he constantly thinks of ways he might kill himself. But each time, something good, no matter how small, stops him. 

Violet Markey lives for the future, counting the days until graduation, when she can escape her Indiana town and her aching grief in the wake of her sister’s recent death.

I have to be honest, This book took me longer to read than the few I read before it. But I’m glad I persevered, very glad. This book gave a true glimpse into depression, the horribly crippling side effect of Bipolar Disorder. And by the time I finished, I had really enjoyed it.

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The novel starts out a little differently, with the two protagonists meeting in the clock tower of their school, contemplating suicide. After this unusual, and uncomfortable beginning, the two take a while to become friends, and eventually more, and this was the part of the book I found a little slow. But as I mentioned, I’m glad I pushed through, because as the two become closer, Violet gets more of a look into Finch’s mind while he begins to slowly fall apart. But I’ll get to Finch later, because for me, he made this book.

Violet Markey has her own demons that she is dealing with. Almost a year ago, her older sister died in a car accident while driving them home from a party. She used to be in with the popular kids, and now she just wants to keep her head down and get to graduation. But then she meets Finch. Finch, over time, pulls violet out of her funk, out of her shell and out into the world. Once again, Violet slowly starts to be excited about things again, and starts to write again, and even starts to drive again. And she, of course, falls in love with Theodore Finch. The thing I love most about Violet is her love of writing, which she has lost, but starts to find again throughout the novel. She used to work on a website with her sister, eleanorandviolet.com, and she later starts up a new project, an online magazine she names Germ, both of which exist and you can visit online. I adore when authors create extra content and avenues for their fans to explore the book.

bright placesTheodore Finch is troubled. He contemplates death, he wanders aimlessly, and he doesn’t really care what people think. Except that he does. He has periods of ‘the Asleep’ – where he can not function, or perform normal day to day tasks, while depression is not spoken about obviously or openly in the book as much as suicide, it is clear that this is what Finch is suffering from. He likely has Bipolar Disorder, suffering his manic periods alongside mania with his excitement about being with Violet, and the uphoria he feels when they are together. The thing about Finch that drew me in – as much as he may just be another quirky, not-fitting-in, rebellious teenage boy – is that I understand him. I have Bipolar Disorder and have struggled, predominately when I was a teenager, with depression and with thoughts of suicide. The way Niven voices Finch, the way he talks about how it feels, even the way Violet observes his behaviour, is how it is when you just don’t fit in the world situation you are living in. When you don’t fit in your body, you don’t fit in the world, you don’t fit anywhere and it’s completely debilitating.

Jennifer Niven beautifully captures the tragic, overbearing, often unnoticed struggle of depression and suicide, for those struggling to avoid it and those struggling to pick up the pieces upon being left behind. I genuinely recommend this book to all ages, as mental illness can strike at any stage in life, and it should not be taboo, we should be able to talk about it, not have to keep it inside.

It’s important to reach out for help if you think you might be suffering from depression, sometimes this is the hardest step to recovery. If you don’t feel like you can talk to anyone in your life, sometimes an anonymous ear to listen can go a long way, contacting a counselling service can save a life. Check out Beyond Blue for more information in battling depression, or suicidal thoughts.

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Popsugar 2015 Reading Challenge: A book by an author I’ve never read before

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We’re All Going to Die (Especially Me), Book Review

Author: Joel Meares 
Published: March 25th 2015 by Black Inc.

My late twenties have felt like a series of slow-motion epiphanies, each one sneaking up before slapping me in my newly acquired jowls. Everything I said I’d do ‘by the time I’m thirty’ as a glassy-eyed graduate is now in the ‘by the time I’m forty’ box.

we're all going to dieI have to admit, it is a completely surreal feeling, reading a book set in the place where you grew up. Particularly when that place has never really been the centre of anything, besides a local newspaper article about realty every now and again. But this book is set where I grew up. And it’s written by someone I grew up knowing. And it’s awesome

Now I’m not plugging this book simply because I somewhat know the author, I am plugging this book because it’s smart, witty, humorous and very entertaining (all at the authors expense of course, but entertaining nonetheless). More of a series of essays rather than an actual story, We’re All Going to Die (Especially Me) illustrates several key points in Meares’ adult life that have caused some kind of awakening about who he was becoming, the man he was as an adult and no longer a fledgling twenty-something. He writes about finally figuring out that he was gay (read more about that here) and about his family life growing up mostly with his mum (more on that here).

beer-smackdown-joel-162x210However big or small each event and it’s telling in the book seem to be, Meares writes with such clever and engaging language (I suppose that’s what being a journalist teaches you), that almost any audience should be captivated by this book. Granted, it’s definitely not targeted at young adults (read: teens), however, there is a lot to be learnt from his discoveries for early twentys to thirties and even older- because let’s face it, we are all always still discovering things about ourselves, that’s very relatable.

You can find a detailed interview with Joel Meares about his book here.

Meares appears at the Sydney Writers’ Festival in the ‘Myself in Pieces’ talk with Kim Williams and Hannie Rayson, Thursday May 21, 3-4pm.

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Popsugar 2015 Reading Challenge: A book set in my hometown

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New Instagram account!

Hey guys!

Just letting you all know I’ve started a new Instagram feed dedicated to books, reviews and recommendations. Feel free to head over and check it out:

 

You can see the whole feed here! Please feel free to come follow and talk books!

x Sami

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